The Battle Against Spam

The Battle Against Spam

Let us take a quick look at the prevalence of spam as explained by Scott McAdams, OMA Public Affairs and Communications Department (www.oma.org): “Researches show unwanted or “junk” e-mail, called spam, represent approximately half of all e-mail messages received. Although it was previously perceived as nothing more than a nuisance, the prevalence of spam has reached a point where numerous users have started to express doubt about the efficiency of e-mail transmissions, and increased concerns regarding the circulation and spread of computer viruses through unwanted messages.” In 2003, President Bush authorized the bill known as “Can Spam,” in December of 2003, which is the very first nationwide standards that focus on bulk unsolicited business e-mail. The Senate, which voted 97 to 0, approved the bill that, bans senders of unsolicited commercial e-mail from making use of false return addresses to camouflage their identification (spoofing) and using dictionaries to produce such mailers. Additionally, it forbids the use of misguiding subject lines and mandates emails to have an opt-out option. The regulations likewise prohibit senders from harvesting addresses off websites. Those who violate these rules will be charged with misdemeanor and could be imprisoned for 1 year. One major factor that needs to be reviewed concerning this: spam is now originating from various other countries in ever-greater numbers. These e-mails are harder to combat, since they originate from outside our nation’s laws and policies. Due to the fact that the Internet opens boundaries and also thinks globally, these legislations are good but they fail to address the problem. So, what is your opinion? Here are the five key tips to protect...
Phishing For Your Identity

Phishing For Your Identity

We have all received those emails that look like they are coming from trusted websites. Emails that direct you to a website that looks familiar to update certain information, even personal data. Beware when these sites are asking you to update secure information such as social security numbers, passwords or even credit card numbers or bank information.   What makes these emails so trusted is that you know the business name as one where you have done business in the past. The logo, colors and look and feel of the site look so familiar. One of the most recent examples is your domain name registrar that says your domain is about to expire. Or your hosting company that says you have run out of hosting space and your website will be taken down if you don’t update your information.   There is a website called WhoIs.com that will give anyone who searches all the details about a domain – where it is registered, who owns it, the address, both email and physical, of the owner and where it is hosted. I was recently introduced to a “scraper” that will create a spreadsheet of all this information for as many websites as you put into the program. Right there at their fingertips is all the information a hacker needs. (More information later on how to protect this.)   You are tempted to click on the link provided because it is so convenient and then when you do it is natural to want to correct false information. Much to your regret you find out later this was a false website that...
What is Cloud Computing

What is Cloud Computing

As a small business owner you need every advantage you can get.  Many business owners are turning to the cloud for this advantage.  Cloud computing can help small businesses grow at a faster pace while at the same time saving money. The concept is that you turn to other companies to store your data and to share software applications over the internet.  There are some risks involved, but it can make small companies grow bigger at a faster pace and save money. Uses of Cloud Computing Most companies use their own computers to store data.  If you have large amounts of data, for example a gaming company, your need for storage will outgrow your available space.  Many companies are opting for cloud computing rather than purchase additional on-site storage. Cloud computing allows companies to store data and only pay for the storage space they use. Think of this like your local storage facility.  You want a small storage area, you only pay for a small area, if you need more space, you upgrade to a larger storage container. Many hospitals are turning to cloud computing for software applications that streamline the admittance process. These programs can be accessed using a mobile device eliminating the need for tablets or laptops.  The staff has quick access to patient information right in their pocket. Revenue from cloud computing is expected to double by the year 2014. There are risks in using this new technology.  Amazon suffered a major shutdown due to cloud computing in April of 2011.  This raised questions on the reliability and security issues of using cloud computing.  You are...